6.23.2022 – when findings appear

when findings appear
sensational vision tends
to optimistic

Reading this morning, I came across the story, ‘People may be overselling the myth’: should we bring back the wolf? by Phoebe Weston, a biodiversity writer for the Guardian.

The story deals with the complex of idea of the benefits derived from the re-release of near extinct predator animals back into the wild.

What I found somewhat refreshing in the article was one, its use of language and word along with the near blasphemous concept that science might be and maybe should be questioned.

When I was a kid growing up in Grand Rapids, Michigan, during the summer one of the big moments of the day was the delivery of the daily paper.

Down in the lower right hand corner of the front page was a small graphic of a thermometer that showed the current temperature of Lake Michigan at the Grand Haven State Park.

As it slowly crept up to near 70 degrees we would get excited and start yelling to our Mom that it was time to get the lake.

The temperature of the water in Lake Michigan along the shore can change in a matter of hours.

The center, deeper parts of the lake never warm up much and neither do the part of the lake, north of Ludington.

A shift of the wind out to out of the north can drop the temperature of the water along the shore faster than you can say ‘get your swimming suit on.’

Yet we would get excited when we got a the information in the paper.

A paper that had been printed sometime that day with information the newspaper staff had picked up, most likely the day before.

So the information we were getting was at least 24 hours old.

Who knew what the water temp was by that time.

Years later I worked at a local TV station and working with the weather team we created and online map that reported the water temperatures of Lake Michigan at the State Parks along the shore.

We had discovered that in all the METAR tables of data that the National Weather Service made available to us, there was a report of Water Temps.

This was daily data that we could get using the internet and use on air.

I told the weather team my story about reading the temp in the paper and how old it was by the time we got it.

This caught the interest of the chief Meteorologist who decided to call the National Weather Service and ask how this water temp data was gathered.

Turned out that State Park Rangers all had a thermometer on a rope and each day, sometime before 11AM, they would take the thermometer down to the beach and throw in the water, reel it in, read of the temp on the thermometer and then call than in to the National Weather Service.

“Were there any guidelines?” my guy asked, “How deep? How long to let it stay in?”

Nope, nope and nope.

The information was now online, but that didn’t make any more accurate.

That’s the science behind that piece of information.

Remember that not all technical advances are cultural ones.

All I know is, I put my toes in Lake Michigan, they got cold.

# # # #

This haiku is one of a couple or more in a series based on this same article.

There were so many good word combinations that I couldn’t pass them up.

And readers of this blog will know that from time to time I struggle with the weight of effort of producing a daily Haiku and any thoughts I may have about the words and time that went in the Haiku that day.

This daily schedule of missing a day can bring on a personal mental paralysis wherein writing these entries becomes impossible.

I learned to deal with this by not dealing with it and let it go.

Then when I look at my register of entries and see blank days with no post, I will grab a topic or book or poem for a source and produce a series of Haiku to fill in those blank dates.

This is one of the great benefits of this effort being my blog and my blog, my rules.

It IS cricket because I say it is.

It is ‘according to Hoyle’ because I say it is.

Thus I have this series of haiku based on this article and the Ms. Weston’s word choices.

I should also mention that this ‘lack of output’ coincided with a trip up to see our son and being away from a computer keyboard for a long weekend and I am playing catch-up.

Other haiku from this passage include:

  • 6 17 2022: being brave enough to
  • 6 16 2022: need to look at the
  • 6 13 2022: enthusiastic
  • 6 6 2022: findings are challenged
  • 6 23 2022: when findings appear
  • 6 21 2022: a landscape of fear
  • 6 20 2022: overselling that
  • 4 30 2022: there are factors that
  • 6.21.2022 – a landscape of fear

    a landscape of fear
    increasingly researchers
    looking, nuances

    Reading the morning paper recently, I came across the story, ‘People may be overselling the myth’: should we bring back the wolf? by Phoebe Weston, a biodiversity writer for the Guardian.

    The story deals with the complex of idea of the benefits derived from the re-release of near extinct predator animals back into the wild.

    What I found somewhat refreshing in the article was one, its use of language and word along with the near blasphemous concept that science might be and maybe should be questioned.

    Question the science?

    Gosh!

    This haiku is one of a couple or more in a series based on this same article.

    There were so many good word combinations that I couldn’t pass them up.

    And readers of this blog will know that from time to time I struggle with the weight of effort of producing a daily Haiku and any thoughts I may have about the words and time that went in the Haiku that day.

    This daily schedule of missing a day can bring on a personal mental paralysis wherein writing these entries becomes impossible.

    I learned to deal with this by not dealing with it and let it go.

    Then when I look at my register of entries and see blank days with no post, I will grab a topic or book or poem for a source and produce a series of Haiku to fill in those blank dates.

    This is one of the great benefits of this effort being my blog and my blog, my rules.

    It IS cricket because I say it is.

    It is ‘according to Hoyle’ because I say it is.

    Thus I have this series of haiku based on this article and the Ms. Weston’s word choices.

    I should also mention that this ‘lack of output’ coincided with a trip up to see our son and being away from a computer keyboard for a long weekend and I am playing catch-up.

    Other haiku from this passage include:

  • 6 17 2022: being brave enough to
  • 6 16 2022: need to look at the
  • 6 13 2022: enthusiastic
  • 6 6 2022: findings are challenged
  • 6 23 2022: when findings appear
  • 6 21 2022: a landscape of fear
  • 6 20 2022: overselling that
  • 4 30 2022: there are factors that
  • 6.20.2022 – overselling that

    overselling that
    myth possibly with the best
    sort of intentions

    Reading the morning paper recently, I came across the story, ‘People may be overselling the myth’: should we bring back the wolf? by Phoebe Weston, a biodiversity writer for the Guardian.

    The story deals with the complex of idea of the benefits derived from the re-release of near extinct predator animals back into the wild.

    What I found somewhat refreshing in the article was one, its use of language and word along with the near blasphemous concept that science might be and maybe should be questioned.

    Question the science?

    Gosh!

    This haiku is one of a couple or more in a series based on this same article.

    There were so many good word combinations that I couldn’t pass them up.

    And readers of this blog will know that from time to time I struggle with the weight of effort of producing a daily Haiku and any thoughts I may have about the words and time that went in the Haiku that day.

    This daily schedule of missing a day can bring on a personal mental paralysis wherein writing these entries becomes impossible.

    I learned to deal with this by not dealing with it and let it go.

    Then when I look at my register of entries and see blank days with no post, I will grab a topic or book or poem for a source and produce a series of Haiku to fill in those blank dates.

    This is one of the great benefits of this effort being my blog and my blog, my rules.

    It IS cricket because I say it is.

    It is ‘according to Hoyle’ because I say it is.

    Thus I have this series of haiku based on this article and the Ms. Weston’s word choices.

    I should also mention that this ‘lack of output’ coincided with a trip up to see our son and being away from a computer keyboard for a long weekend and I am playing catch-up.

    Other haiku from this passage include:

  • 6 17 2022: being brave enough to
  • 6 16 2022: need to look at the
  • 6 13 2022: enthusiastic
  • 6 6 2022: findings are challenged
  • 6 23 2022: when findings appear
  • 6 21 2022: a landscape of fear
  • 6 20 2022: overselling that
  • 4 30 2022: there are factors that
  • 6.17.2022 – being brave enough to

    being brave enough to
    embrace subjectivity
    really central here

    Reading the morning paper recently, I came across the story, ‘People may be overselling the myth’: should we bring back the wolf? by Phoebe Weston, a biodiversity writer for the Guardian.

    The story deals with the complex of idea of the benefits derived from the re-release of near extinct predator animals back into the wild.

    What I found somewhat refreshing in the article was one, its use of language and word along with the near blasphemous concept that science might be and maybe should be questioned.

    Question the science?

    Gosh!

    This haiku is one of a couple or more in a series based on this same article.

    There were so many good word combinations that I couldn’t pass them up.

    And readers of this blog will know that from time to time I struggle with the weight of effort of producing a daily Haiku and any thoughts I may have about the words and time that went in the Haiku that day.

    This daily schedule of missing a day can bring on a personal mental paralysis wherein writing these entries becomes impossible.

    I learned to deal with this by not dealing with it and let it go.

    Then when I look at my register of entries and see blank days with no post, I will grab a topic or book or poem for a source and produce a series of Haiku to fill in those blank dates.

    This is one of the great benefits of this effort being my blog and my blog, my rules.

    It IS cricket because I say it is.

    It is ‘according to Hoyle’ because I say it is.

    Thus I have this series of haiku based on this article and the Ms. Weston’s word choices.

    I should also mention that this ‘lack of output’ coincided with a trip up to see our son and being away from a computer keyboard for a long weekend and I am playing catch-up.

    Other haiku from this passage include:

  • 6 17 2022: being brave enough to
  • 6 16 2022: need to look at the
  • 6 13 2022: enthusiastic
  • 6 6 2022: findings are challenged
  • 6 23 2022: when findings appear
  • 6 21 2022: a landscape of fear
  • 6 20 2022: overselling that
  • 4 30 2022: there are factors that
  • 6.16.2022 – need to look at the

    need to look at the
    rhetoric, the narratives
    and think honesty

    Reading the morning paper recently, I came across the story, ‘People may be overselling the myth’: should we bring back the wolf? by Phoebe Weston, a biodiversity writer for the Guardian.

    The story deals with the complex of idea of the benefits derived from the re-release of near extinct predator animals back into the wild.

    What I found somewhat refreshing in the article was one, its use of language and word along with the near blasphemous concept that science might be and maybe should be questioned.

    Question the science?

    Gosh!

    This haiku is one of a couple or more in a series based on this same article.

    There were so many good word combinations that I couldn’t pass them up.

    And readers of this blog will know that from time to time I struggle with the weight of effort of producing a daily Haiku and any thoughts I may have about the words and time that went in the Haiku that day.

    This daily schedule of missing a day can bring on a personal mental paralysis wherein writing these entries becomes impossible.

    I learned to deal with this by not dealing with it and let it go.

    Then when I look at my register of entries and see blank days with no post, I will grab a topic or book or poem for a source and produce a series of Haiku to fill in those blank dates.

    This is one of the great benefits of this effort being my blog and my blog, my rules.

    It IS cricket because I say it is.

    It is ‘according to Hoyle’ because I say it is.

    Thus I have this series of haiku based on this article and the Ms. Weston’s word choices.

    I should also mention that this ‘lack of output’ coincided with a trip up to see our son and being away from a computer keyboard for a long weekend and I am playing catch-up.

    Other haiku from this passage include:

  • 6 17 2022: being brave enough to
  • 6 16 2022: need to look at the
  • 6 13 2022: enthusiastic
  • 6 6 2022: findings are challenged
  • 6 23 2022: when findings appear
  • 6 21 2022: a landscape of fear
  • 6 20 2022: overselling that
  • 4 30 2022: there are factors that
  • 6.15.2023 – When out here no place

    When out here no place
    to go but in when indoors no
    place to go but out

    When I’m out here,” he said, “there’s no place to go but in. When I’m indoors, there’s no place to go but out in the yard.

    That’s where you’re wrong, my friend,” said a voice.

    You don’t have to stay in that dirty-little dirty-little dirty-little yard,” said the goose, who talked rather fast. “One of the boards is loose. Push on it, push-push-push on it, and come on out!”

    So said the goose to Wilbur the pig in Charlotte’s Web.

    Please excuse me, I am going to go and push on some boards in the fence around me and see if I can’t find a way out.

    But be warned, after getting out, Wilbur says, “If this is what it’s like to be free,” he thought, “I believe I’d rather be penned up in my own yard.”

    6.13.2022 – enthusiastic

    enthusiastic
    realistic respectful
    different opinion

    Reading the morning paper recently, I came across the story, ‘People may be overselling the myth’: should we bring back the wolf? by Phoebe Weston, a biodiversity writer for the Guardian.

    The story deals with the complex of idea of the benefits derived from the re-release of near extinct predator animals back into the wild.

    What I found somewhat refreshing in the article was one, its use of language and word along with the near blasphemous concept that science might be and maybe should be questioned.

    Question the science?

    Gosh!

    This haiku is one of a couple or more in a series based on this same article.

    There were so many good word combinations that I couldn’t pass them up.

    And readers of this blog will know that from time to time I struggle with the weight of effort of producing a daily Haiku and any thoughts I may have about the words and time that went in the Haiku that day.

    This daily schedule of missing a day can bring on a personal mental paralysis wherein writing these entries becomes impossible.

    I learned to deal with this by not dealing with it and let it go.

    Then when I look at my register of entries and see blank days with no post, I will grab a topic or book or poem for a source and produce a series of Haiku to fill in those blank dates.

    This is one of the great benefits of this effort being my blog and my blog, my rules.

    It IS cricket because I say it is.

    It is ‘according to Hoyle’ because I say it is.

    Thus I have this series of haiku based on this article and the Ms. Weston’s word choices.

    I should also mention that this ‘lack of output’ coincided with a trip up to see our son and being away from a computer keyboard for a long weekend and I am playing catch-up.

    Other haiku from this passage include:

  • 6 17 2022: being brave enough to
  • 6 16 2022: need to look at the
  • 6 13 2022: enthusiastic
  • 6 6 2022: findings are challenged
  • 6 23 2022: when findings appear
  • 6 21 2022: a landscape of fear
  • 6 20 2022: overselling that
  • 4 30 2022: there are factors that
  • 6.6.2022 – findings are challenged

    findings are challenged
    most people don’t hear stories
    are less appealing.

    Reading the morning paper recently, I came across the story, ‘People may be overselling the myth’: should we bring back the wolf? by Phoebe Weston, a biodiversity writer for the Guardian.

    The story deals with the complex of idea of the benefits derived from the re-release of near extinct predator animals back into the wild.

    What I found somewhat refreshing in the article was one, its use of language and word along with the near blasphemous concept that science might be and maybe should be questioned.

    Question the science?

    Gosh!

    This haiku is one of a couple or more in a series based on this same article.

    There were so many good word combinations that I couldn’t pass them up.

    And readers of this blog will know that from time to time I struggle with the weight of effort of producing a daily Haiku and any thoughts I may have about the words and time that went in the Haiku that day.

    This daily schedule of missing a day can bring on a personal mental paralysis wherein writing these entries becomes impossible.

    I learned to deal with this by not dealing with it and let it go.

    Then when I look at my register of entries and see blank days with no post, I will grab a topic or book or poem for a source and produce a series of Haiku to fill in those blank dates.

    This is one of the great benefits of this effort being my blog and my blog, my rules.

    It IS cricket because I say it is.

    It is ‘according to Hoyle’ because I say it is.

    Thus I have this series of haiku based on this article and the Ms. Weston’s word choices.

    I should also mention that this ‘lack of output’ coincided with a trip up to see our son and being away from a computer keyboard for a long weekend and I am playing catch-up.

    Other haiku from this passage include:

  • 6 17 2022: being brave enough to
  • 6 16 2022: need to look at the
  • 6 13 2022: enthusiastic
  • 6 6 2022: findings are challenged
  • 6 23 2022: when findings appear
  • 6 21 2022: a landscape of fear
  • 6 20 2022: overselling that
  • 4 30 2022: there are factors that
  • 5.29.2022 – bastardization

    bastardization
    of the promise – Merced to
    Bakersfield – who cares?

    Reading the article, Train to nowhere: can California’s high-speed rail project ever get back on track?, I could not help but laugh out loud over a comment about the once $9 Billion Dollar high speed train from Los Angeles to San Francisco that was funded in 2008 and planned to open in 2020 has so far cost $5Billions, might get a stretch of railroad (normal non-high speed railroad) open between the California cities of Merced and Bakersfield by 2030.

    I am ignorant of much California geography without looking at a map but those two connections didn’t make much of impact on me.

    The comment that made me laugh was made by an early advocate and cheer leader of the Cal High Speed Rail, Mr. Quentin Kopp, a retired former legislator and judge, who also felt that connecting Merced and Bakersfield did not make much sense.

    Mr. Kopp said, ““Who cares about going from Merced to Bakersfield? I am appalled and angry over the bastardization of the promise to taxpayers … It’s a stupid waste of money. All this is doing is making contractors and engineers and bureaucrats fat and happy.

    The article goes on to explain that while other countries have implemented high speed rail, The United States, by contrast, has a highly decentralized system of government, with multiple competing jurisdictions jostling over land, water, electricity and other vital resources, and a political tradition, especially in the west, that celebrates personal freedom and private property over collective enterprises in the public interest.

    In the words of Charlie Brown, “THAT’S IT!”

    I propose that the United States Mint add something to our coins.

    Where a coin is stamped, “E Pluribus Unum” I want an * added so it reads, “E Pluribus Unum*”.

    E Pluribus Unum?

    You remember that one don’t you?

    One, out of many.

    Then on the bottom of the coin, I want it to say, *The United States has a highly decentralized system of government, with multiple competing jurisdictions jostling over land, water, electricity and other vital resources, and a political tradition, that celebrates personal freedom and private property over collective enterprises in the public interest.

    Should the word money be added so that it reads, money, land, water …

    Or is money understood to be included in that less vulgar term, vital resources?

    It works either way and it seems to answer a whole lot of questions today about the United States of America.

    Talk about a the bastardization of a promise.

    What promise?

    The promise that we WERE one out of many.

    The promise the we were something new.

    Novus ordo seclorum it says on the One Dollar bill.

    The New Order of the Age!

    The New Order of the Age?

    Maybe that’s why it ended up on the $1.

    All in all, it comes to Mr. Lincoln’s warning in his Dec 1, 1862 annual message to Congress when he said, “We shall nobly save, or meanly lose, the last best hope of earth.”

    5.24.2022 – caring deeply and

    caring deeply and
    passionately, really, has
    gone out of our lives

    Roger Angell has died.

    Born in 1920 and the son of Katherine Angell White (which made him the step son of EB White), Roger Angell wrote about baseball for the New Yorker Magazine for as long as I can remember.

    To say, though, that Roger Angell wrote about baseball is much like saying Michelangelo painted ceilings.

    There was so much more than that to what Mr. Angell wrote.

    The focus, the reason for the writing was baseball, but the words were brought together in ways that were magical and poetry.

    It was after the 1975 World Series, the famous game six that was won by the Red Sox on a home run in the bottom of the 12th inning, late, late at night in Fenway Park, that Mr. Angell wrote:

    What I do know is that this belonging and caring is what our games are all about: this is what we come for.

    It is foolish and childish, on the face of it, to affiliate ourselves with anything so insignificant and patently contrived and commercially exploitative as a professional sports team, and the amused superiority and icy scorn that the non-fan directs at the sports nut (I know this look — I know it by heart) is understandable and almost unanswerable.

    Almost.

    What is left out of this calculation, it seems to me, is the business of caring — caring deeply and passionately, really caring — which is a capacity or an emotion that has almost gone out of our lives.

    And so it seems possible that we have come to a time when it no longer matters so much what the caring is about, how frail or foolish is the object of that concern, as long as the feeling itself can be saved.

    Naïveté — the infantile and ignoble joy that sends a grown man or woman to dancing and shouting with joy in the middle of the night over the haphazardous flight of a distant ball — seems a small price to pay for such a gift.

    Mr. Angell was a not so much a sports reporter but a baseball commentator.

    Each year, it seems to me now, he would write an essay that previewed the upcoming season, then an essay or too on the season so far and then an essay recapping the season just finished.

    These 4 or 5 essays over the course of a year all appeared in the New Yorker Magazine.

    Written a leisure with thoughtfulness beyond anything but appreciation, Mr. Angell could bring each and every game he covered to life though it had been over for some time.

    I was 8 years old when the Detroit Tigers won the World Series in 1968.

    It wasn’t until years later that I was able to understand and appreciate what when on in that World Series, the dual between Denny McCain and Bob Gibson and the slow turtle-and-the-hare story Mickey Lolich pitching his way to 3 World Series wins, and I got those stories from reading Roger Angell’s account in an essay titled, “A LITTLE NOISE AT TWILIGHT.”

    But like the Persian Rug with the missing knot so it wouldn’t be perfect, Mr. Angell did make mistakes.

    I always felt somehow privileged that I caught one.

    But to this day, I am not sure if the error was Mr. White’s or his editor.

    Here is the passage in question?

    Can you find the mistake?

    The scene is late in Game 7 of the ’68 Series between the Cardinals and Tigers.

    The game is in St. Louis and the series is tied 3-3.

    Mr. White wrote: Still no score. Summer and the Series were running out. Gibson had permitted only one base-runner in the game, and here were the Tigers down to their last seventh inning of the year. Gibson fanned Stanley, for his thirty-fourth strikeout of the Series, and Kaline grounded out. At three and two, Cash singled to right. Horton hit to the left side, and the ball went through for a single. Northrup lined the first pitch high and deep, but straight to center, where Curt Flood started in, reversed abruptly, and then stumbled, kicking up a divot of grass. He recovered in an instant and raced toward the fence, but the ball bounced beyond him, a good four hundred feet out; Northrup had a triple, and two runs were in. Freehan doubled past Brock in left, for the third.

    It is right there in plain sight.

    For me, it made Mr. Angell more human and that much more great.

    Roger Angell has died.

    This is when I quote John O`Hara on the death of George Gershwin.

    I don’t have to believe it if I don’t want to.