9.29.2022 – mistakes, those crummy

mistakes, those crummy
mistakes are only mistakes
if admitted to

“Generosity, that was my first mistake,” so says bandit leader Calvera in the Magnificent Seven.

And, sorry, you can remake this movie 100 times but Calvera will always, only be Eli Wallach.

Even a bandit leader can admit to a mistake.

Neither here nor, but I was reading today about how the President was making a speech and asked if a certain Congresswoman was in attendance.

The Congresswoman in question was not in attendance as the Congresswoman was dead.

When the Congresswoman was killed in a car accident earlier this year, the White House had issued a statement of remorse and condolence in the name of the President so it was fair to assume the President was aware of her untimely demise.

When the White Press Office was questioned about it, “Did the President mis-speak, make a mistake, was the error in his prepared teleprompter remarks?”

But the Press Office would say neither Yeah no Nay and ended their comments with, “I’ve answered it multiple times already in this room, and my answer is certainly not going to change,” she said. “All of you may have views on how I’m answering it, but I am answering the question to the way that he saw it. And the way that we see it.

Not looking for a political axe to grind either way but just wondering why it is so difficult for the feller in the White House to say “I made a mistake.”

The previous feller admitted every mistake he ever made.

I mean to say, the previous feller would have admitted any mistake the minute he made that first mistake.

So in 2019, Hurricane Dorian was coming.

The President was told that the east coast would be hit along with Bahama.

The President heard what he wanted to hear and when he tweeted (I don’t miss those days one bit) instead of Bahama, he includes Alabama.

Trump, Donald J (September 1, 2019). “In addition to Florida – South Carolina, North Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama, will most likely be hit (much) harder than anticipated. Looking like one of the largest hurricanes ever. Already category 5. BE CAREFUL! GOD BLESS EVERYONE!”. (Twitter).

Which came as a great surprise to the people in Alabama.

Rather than say oops, the White House went to great lengths to PROVE that Alabama had ALWAYS been in the predicted path was coming.

I am reminded of a bit of dialogue in the book the Caine Mutiny where Captain Queeg is being questioned by a Captain Grace about the tow line cutting incident.

Captain Grace asks Queeg to be honest and admit he made a mistake.

Captain Grace says, “... let’s both put this incident behind us. On that basis I can understand it and forget it. It was a mistake, a mistake due to anxiety and inexperience. But there’s no man in the Navy who’s never made a mistake

But Queeg (in the movie played by Humphrey Bogart but it is important to remember that in the book, Queeg is around 28 years old) responds, “No, Captain, I assure you I appreciate what you say, but I am not so stupid as to lie to a superior officer, and I assure you my first version o£ what happened is correct and I do not believe I have made any mistake as yet in commanding the Caine nor do I intend to.

In a way it was good to hear he did not INTEND to make a mistake, but I digress.

Ho-hummmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm.

In July of 1863, after General Grant took Vicksburg he got this note from the President that said in part, “When you got below, and took Port-Gibson, Grand Gulf, and vicinity, I thought you should go down the river and join Gen. Banks; and when you turned Northward East of the Big Black, I feared it was a mistake. I now wish to make the personal acknowledgment that you were right, and I was wrong.”

It was signed, simply, A. Lincoln.

A later comment on this letter by a friend of Mr. Lincoln’s said, “was not intended for effect as some suppose but was perfectly in character.”

Character.

Good word.

Better character trait.

To have character I mean.

I guess instead of people with character, today the Office of President of the United States only attracts people who are characters.

9.21.2022 – and treated him as

and treated him as
if he was a halfwit – most
people do these days

I DO like how Brit’s can turn a phrase in the same manner in which they might turn a knife into someone’s rib cage.

Consider this paragraph:

Miliband treated Rees-Mogg as if he was a halfwit. Most people do these days. Long gone are the times when MPs were impressed by his faux politeness and smug self-confidence, squeezed into an oversized undertaker’s suit. Now people see him for the needy fraud that he is.

this is the half-wit himself – Mr. Rees-Mogg does have that Barney Fife/Gomer Pyle look doesn’t he?

The article, Tories usher in their brave new world of half-arsed fantasy by John Crace, got better.

Maybe we need to introduced half-arsed into our lexicon.

Consider again these paragraphs (I can feel the fun as Mr. Crace’s fingers typed them out.)

But she has at least chosen her new health secretary wisely. Because when you’ve got no ideas, who better than Thérèse Coffey? A woman of no imagination and no great brain. But someone who can be relied to come up with some nonsense on the back of a cigar packet.

Sure enough, Coffey did not disappoint, coming up with – in the absence of a plan – a memory game. A was for Ambulance. B was for Backlog. C was for Care. D was for Doctor. And E was for total fucking Eejit. Poor Thérèse. She didn’t realise how shabby and half-arsed her ideas were.

The sad part, as in all political commentary, is the writing is about people who are making the decisions, the real decisions, that really do affect us all.

As Mr. Crace concluded his writing, “Truly we are screwed”.

9.16.2022 – but the truth that

but the truth that
nobody knows does nothing
to settle debate

In an article about the US and World economy, Mr. Paul Krugman used some very interesting words when discussing the ecomony.

Mr. Krugman, according to his short bio, joined The New York Times in 2000 as an Op-Ed columnist. He is distinguished professor in the Graduate Center Economics Ph.D. program and distinguished scholar at the Luxembourg Income Study Center at the City University of New York. In addition, he is professor emeritus at the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs.

He is, all at the same time, a distinguished professor and a distinguished scholar as well as a professor emeritus which should be good enough for anyone.

Mr. Krugman’s latest observations appear in the NYT Opinion piece, Who’s Afraid of the Consumer Price Index?

Like any good opinion piece on economics, Mr. Krugman uses all the standard terms like inflation expectations, Bureau of Labor Statistics, consumer prices, alternative formulation, immaculate disinflation, significant cooling off, job vacancies, higher unemployment and the ever popular, temporary phenomenon.

Entirely appropriate and expected use of language.

But unexpectedly Mr. Krugman also uses the terms If you still believed, I guess and But the truth is.

If you still believed.

I guess

But the truth is.

NOW that is a gutty enconomist.

Mr. Krugman wraps up his piece with this paragraph:

But the truth is that nobody knows for sure, and the fact that a hot economy is still producing heated inflation does nothing to settle the debate.

Mr. Krugman wraps up his piece with these paragraphs:

The good news, sort of, is that the Fed seems to know what it doesn’t know. It’s talking tough on inflation, as it must to retain credibility, but it’s also talking about looking at the “totality of the incoming data,” which means that it’s prepared to ease off if and when inflation is clearly coming down.

My guess is that this moment will come sooner than many think. But we’ll just have to wait and see.

But we’ll just have to wait and see.

But we’ll just have to wait and see?

I would like to refer Mr. Krugman to Chance the Gardener in the old movie, Being There.

Mr. Gardener said: As long as the roots are not severed, all is well. And all will be well in the garden. In the garden, growth has it seasons. First comes spring and summer, but then we have fall and winter. And then we get spring and summer again.”

In the movie, the President listens to this and says, “I admire your good, solid sense. That’s precisely what we lack on Capitol Hill.”

BTW, the movie Being There was released in 1979.

We’ll just have to wait and see.

9.13.2020 – the seven decades

the seven decades
of history-making reign
bore witness to an age

Adapted from A Proclamation on the Death of Queen Elizabeth II by the President of the United States.

The line in question states, “The seven decades of her history-making reign bore witness to an age of unprecedented human advancement and the forward march of human dignity.

An age of unprecedented human advancement and the forward march of human dignity.

Well, as Arlo Guthrie liked to say, in a World were everyone got along, anyone would have to accomplish as awful of lot of good to stand out. But in a world that sucks, you might be surprised what you can accomplish with just a smile.

The Proclamation reads:

 Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II was more than a monarch.  She defined an era.

    In a world of constant change, she was a steadying presence and a source of comfort and pride for generations of Britons, including many who have never known their country without her.  Queen Elizabeth II led always with grace, an unwavering commitment to duty, and the incomparable power of her example.  She was a stateswoman of unmatched dignity and constancy who deepened the bedrock Alliance between the United Kingdom and the United States.  She helped make our relationship special.  The seven decades of her history-making reign bore witness to an age of unprecedented human advancement and the forward march of human dignity.  Her legacy will loom large in the pages of British history, and in the story of our world. 

   As a mark of respect for the memory of Queen Elizabeth II, by the authority vested in me as President of the United States by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, I hereby order that the flag of the United States shall be flown at half-staff at the White House and upon all public buildings and grounds, at all military posts and naval stations, and on all naval vessels of the Federal Government in the District of Columbia and throughout the United States and its Territories and possessions until sunset, on the day of interment.  I also direct that the flag shall be flown at half-staff for the same length of time at all United States embassies, legations, consular offices, and other facilities abroad, including all military facilities and naval vessels and stations.

     IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand twenty-two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and forty-seventh.

                               JOSEPH R. BIDEN JR.

Hereunto set my hand this eighth day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand twenty-two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and forty-seventh.

2022 years of Our Lord and 247 years of us.

Interesting that no one seems to notice how this country finishes off a proclomation.

9.7.2022 – monarch of all he

monarch of all he
surveyed, but it didn’t seem
to mean anything

The Tiger Who Would Be King

One morning the tiger woke up in the jungle and told his mate that he was king of beasts.

“Leo, the lion, is king of beasts,” she said.

“We need a change,” said the tiger. “The creatures are crying for a change.”

The tigress listened but she could hear no crying, except that of her cubs.

“I’ll be king of beasts by the time the moon rises,” said the tiger. “It will be a yellow moon with black stripes, in my honor.”

“Oh, sure,” said the tigress as she went to look after her young, one of whom, a male, very like his father, had got an imaginary thorn in his paw.

The tiger prowled through the jungle till he came to the lion’s den. “Come out,” he roared, “and greet the king of beasts! The king is dead, long live the king!”

Inside the den, the lioness woke her mate. “The king is here to see you,” she said.

“What king?” he inquired, sleepily.

“The king of beasts,” she said.

“I am the king of beasts,” roared Leo, and he charged out of the den to defend his crown against the pretender.

It was a terrible fight, and it lasted until the setting of the sun. All the animals of the jungle joined in, some taking the side of the tiger and others the side of the lion. Every creature from the aardvark to the zebra took part in the struggle to overthrow the lion or to repulse the tiger, and some did not know which they were fighting for, and some fought for both, and some fought whoever was nearest, and some fought for the sake of fighting.

“What are we fighting for?” someone asked the aardvark.

“The old order,” said the aardvark.

“What are we dying for?” someone asked the zebra.

“The new order,” said the zebra.

When the moon rose, fevered and gibbous, it shone upon a jungle in which nothing stirred except a macaw and a cockatoo, screaming in horror. All the beasts were dead except the tiger, and his days were numbered and his time was ticking away. He was monarch of all he surveyed, but it didn’t seem to mean anything.

MORAL: You can’t very well be king of beasts if there aren’t any.

From Further Fables for Our Time by James Thurber (1956)

I might change the title of the book of essays to Further Fables OF Our Time.

9.2.2022 – acknowledges with

acknowledges with
nothing enormity of
calamity ahead

In an article discussing the next Prime Minister of Great Britain, Polly Toynbee wrote:

But next week we face the appointment of a leader with nothing to say that acknowledges the enormity of the calamity ahead.

In writing about on the loser in the race to meet the Queen and ‘kiss hands’, Ms. Tonybee wrote:

Rishi Sunak pitching to Tory party members in leafy Hertfordshire this week faced not one question – not a single one – concerning the cost of living crisis. From this twilight zone of unreality emerges a leader unfit to grapple with the worst crisis of our lifetime, with a typical 10% fall in disposable income predicted by 2024, according to the Resolution Foundation, which would be worse than during the 1970s oil shock, the worst in a century.

New perils come daily. Corner shops and pubs will close. Libraries and museums can’t be warm hubs for cold people as they shut to save fuel bills. Schools, hospitals, nurseries and colleges can’t pay. Credit card borrowing will soar, and food banks are already running out of food.

Ms. Tonybee is writing about Great Britain.

It was John Adams who said of Great Britain, that he wished. “… to restore the old good nature and the old good humor between people who, though separated by an ocean and under different governments, have the same language, a similar religion, and kindred blood.”

The beginning as it were, of the ‘special relationship’ between GB and the USA.

A relationship so special that we here in the USA seem to have all the same problems, just 5 hours later.

When it is said that over there that new perils come daily.

Corner shops and pubs will close.

Libraries and museums can’t be warm hubs for cold people as they shut to save fuel bills.

Schools, hospitals, nurseries and colleges can’t pay.

Credit card borrowing will soar, and food banks are already running out of food.

You can bet, it is on the way here.

Sadly the same problem with leadership is already here.

Our leaders have nothing to say that acknowledges the enormity of the calamity ahead.

As Mr. Lincoln said on December 1, 1862, The dogmas of the quiet past, are inadequate to the stormy present. The occasion is piled high with difficulty, and we must rise — with the occasion. As our case is new, so we must think anew, and act anew. We must disenthrall ourselves, and then we shall save our country.

And it was Mr. (FD) Roosevelt who said, “This great Nation will endure as it has endured, will revive and will prosper. So, first of all, let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself–nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into advance.”

Fear.

Fear itself.

Nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror.

Easy right?

Best I can do is point to FDR’s closing line for that speech in 1933.

 We humbly ask the blessing of God. May He protect each and every one of us. May He guide me in the days to come.

Humbly, disenthrall ourselves, and then, maybe, we shall save our country.

8.19.2022 – a simplistic

a simplistic
and egalitarian
expression … o
f hate

Thinking about wrongs in place of rights as in voters ‘rights’.

Seems like there should be a bill of wrongs.

A Bill of Rights of what you get through being a citizen of the United States.

A Bill of Wrongs of what you don’t get through being a citizen of the United States.

But I digress.

What I wanted to consider today was a chicken or egg discussion.

And I am going to the land of don’t go there and will ask, did Trump come first and his followers follow?

Or did a certain following find a their voice through Trump and got on his bandwagon by letting Trump get in front.

I came across this discussion about this question.

In fanning the flames of Make America Great Again, involving a profound sense of national conservative community, identity, and destiny, Trump had built upon quite the opposite of what most observers – even the Republican elite, on occasion – assumed.

The “belief that under Trump, the Republicans were, so to speak, subjected to total communicative and ideological brainwashing” by Trump and his right wing accomplices was simply not fact, the official historians concluded.

“The widespread view that systematic government propaganda kept the population ready and willing for action, or even created a unified ‘national’ feeling among them, ignores reality,” the historians pointed out.

“Identification with the nation could not be produced on command, and as a rule propaganda was convincing only to those already converted.”

Right wing radical nationalism, stretching back decades before Trump, was in truth “the precondition for propaganda being successful, not the other way around.”

Trump and the FOX news propaganda had succeeded so well, in other words, because it hinged upon “established nationalist beliefs.”

The “spreading of racist, xenophobic, or authoritarian stereotypes” worked so effectively because such propaganda was directed at “voters already predisposed to them.”

In a country like the United States, given the country’s history since its early times, Trump had understood as a Republican outsider that the very concept of democracy was foreign.

Republican right wing radical intellectuals had for years sneered at it – and had avoided practical politics.

With its rich history of constitutional warfare at the epicenter of America, and its distaste for thinking through or dealing with the necessary compromises involved in civilized society, Republican right wing radicals could therefore, in the wake of deep economic depression, be encouraged to focus on a supposedly egalitarian, simplistic expression of nationalist identity: one that, in order to cohere and remain strong, must see others – whether foreigners or non-whites – as enemies: enemies to be excluded, disrespected, defeated. And where deemed necessary, simply liquidated, without remorse or compunction.

Anyone who objected to the nationalistic program of the Republican right wing was “othered”.

Far from becoming a nation of warrior-serfs obeying a draconian Trump, in other words, nationalistic Republican right wing radicals had become loyal and obedient members of a community – proud and arrogant citizens of a revived country dedicated to MAGA.

Makes you think.

In order to cohere and remain strong, must see others – whether foreigners or non-whites – as enemies: enemies to be excluded, disrespected, defeated.

So here is the twist.

I DID indeed read this passage in a book the other day.

But it wasn’t a book about Trump.

In the book, Commander in chief : FDR’s battle with Churchill, 1943, (2016 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt : Boston), the author, Nigel Hamilton, was making a point about defeating Nazi Germany.

He wrote the above passage about Germany in 1943.

I swapped out Trump for Hitler and Republican Right Wing Radicals for Nazi’s and changes along that line.

The original passage reads thusly: “In fanning the flames of Volksgemeinschaft, involving a profound sense of national German community, identity, and destiny, Hitler had built upon quite the opposite of what most observers – even the Nazi elite, on occasion – assumed. The “belief that under National Socialism the Germans were, so to speak, subjected to total communicative and ideological brainwashing” by Hitler and his Nazi accomplices was simply not fact, the official historians concluded. “The widespread view that systematic government propaganda kept the population ready and willing for war, or even created a unified ‘national’ feeling among them, ignores reality,” the historians pointed out. “Identification with the nation could not be produced on command, and as a rule propaganda was convincing only to those already converted.” German nationalism, stretching back decades before Hitler, was in truth “the precondition for propaganda being successful, not the other way around.” Hitler and Goebbels’s propaganda had succeeded so well, in other words, because it hinged upon “established nationalist beliefs.” The “spreading of racist, xenophobic, or authoritarian stereotypes” had, as instanced in the conquest of Poland and huge swaths of the Soviet Union, worked so effectively because such propaganda was directed at “soldiers already predisposed to them.” In a country like Germany, given the country’s warring history since ancient times, Hitler had understood as an Austrian outsider that the very concept of democracy was foreign. German intellectuals had for centuries sneered at it – and had avoided practical politics, preferring philosophy, the arts, and science. With its rich history of land warfare at the epicenter of Europe, and its distaste for thinking through or dealing with the necessary compromises involved in civilized society, Germany’s people could therefore, in the wake of deep economic depression and defeat in World War I, be encouraged to focus on a supposedly egalitarian, simplistic expression of nationalist German identity: one that, in order to cohere and remain strong, must see others – whether foreigners or Jews, communists or non-Aryans – as enemies: enemies to be excluded, disrespected, defeated. And where deemed necessary, simply liquidated, without remorse or compunction. Anyone who objected to the nationalistic program in Germany was “othered,” while “in foreign affairs” the “seed was planted for the future offensive war of extermination,” the German official historians concluded. “War, established as a permanent component of German politics as an inheritance from the First World War, from then on became the natural means of achieving political ends both at home and abroad.” Far from becoming a nation of warrior-serfs obeying a draconian führer, in other words, nationalistic Germans had become loyal and obedient members of a community – proud and arrogant citizens of a revived empire: a third Reich, a Volksgemeinschaft, a “master race” of individuals each cognizant at some level and largely supportive of the genocide being directed against Jews in Germany as well as outside Germany on their behalf; supportive, too, of barbarous treatment of enemies such as Russian Untermenschen, since the denigration of “others” only increased and inflamed this powerful sense of national German identity.”

Easy to make many conclusions and easy to miss many conclusions.

For myself, I will let you readers come to your own conclusions.

I will say this.

Watch the news.

On one channel you will hear nothing but news about injustice.

On the other channel you will hear nothing but news about injustice.

But there does seem to be a lot more hate,

a lot more disrespect,

a lot more arrogance,

on one of those channels.

As the Bible says, “By their fruit you will recognize them.” (Matthew 7:16)

And the Bible says, “And now these three remain: faith, hope and love. But the greatest of these is love.

Draws a line in the sand there.

8.17.2022 – now and then we had

now and then we had
hope, if good, God would permit
us to be … pirates

In Life on the Mississippi, Mark Twain writes, ” … now and then we had a hope that if we lived and were good, God would permit us to be pirates.

The 62nd Psalms says:

Surely the lowborn are but a breath,
the highborn are but a lie.
If weighed on a balance, they are nothing;
together they are only a breath.
Do not trust in extortion
or put vain hope in stolen goods;
though your riches increase,
do not set your heart on them.

One thing God has spoken,
two things I have heard:
“Power belongs to you, God,
and with you, Lord, is unfailing love”;
and, “You reward everyone
according to what they have done.”

Power belongs to you, God, and with you, Lord, is unfailing love.

God rewards everyone according to what they have done.

We have a hope that if we live and we are good …

God might permit us to be pirates.

Much like Mr. Twain’s Tom Sawyer when Mr. Sawyer examined the fence he had to whitewash, and all gladness left him and a deep melancholy settled down upon his spirit. Thirty yards of board fence nine feet high. Life to him seemed hollow, and existence but a burden, when I examine the news of the day, all gladness leaves me and a deep melancholy settles down upon my spirit.

The thirty yards of board fence nine feet high that is today’s news, the cult of Trump, the cult of lies, the cult of guns and those who embrace those cults.

Life to me seems hollow, and existence but a burden.

I hope they also read that surely that the highborn are but a lie.
If weighed on a balance, they are nothing; together they are only a breath.
Do not trust in extortion or put vain hope in stolen goods;
though your riches increase, do not set your heart on them.

For me, I have a hope that if I live and am good, God would permit me to be a pirate.

For right now, that sounds pretty good.

7.16.2022 – this establishment

this establishment –
conservative progressives?
this isn’t normal

Reading this week in the New York Times, two opinion pieces caught my eye.

The first was by David Brooks in his piece, “A 2024 Presidential Candidate Who Meets the Moment” where he commented that:

I’d like you to consider the possibility that the political changes that have rocked this country over the past six years will be nothing compared with the changes that will rock it over the next six. I’d like you to consider the possibility that we’re in some sort of prerevolutionary period — the kind of moment that often gives birth to something shocking and new.

And …

If ever there was a moment ripe for a Ross Perot-like third candidate in the 2024 general election, this is that moment. There are efforts underway to prepare the way for a third candidate, and in this environment an outsider, with no ties to the status quo, who runs against the establishment and on the idea that we need to fundamentally fix the system — well, that person could wind up winning the presidency.

He commented that:

Democrats had a larger share of support among white college graduates than among nonwhite voters. These white voters are often motivated by social policy issues like abortion rights and gun regulation.

The Republicans used to be the party of business, but now they are emerging as a multiracial working-class party.

In other words, we now have an establishment progressive party and an anti-establishment conservative party. This isn’t normal.

So I gots to ask, what is normal.

When the Founding Fathers set all this out, they went to great lengths to protect the rights of the minority.

They did this, in my humble opinion, because they thought THERE would be a minority and a very generous MAJORITY.

I feel that what they thought would be normal would be a strong Executive of one Party and a strong Legislative of another party that would serve as a check and a balance on either (with an impartial Judicial keeping an eye on both.

Oh those Founding Fathers!

You silly fellows.

You have to admit that their plan worked out rather well when Mr. Nixon mis-behaved and a Congress of another party called him on it and a court with 4 Nixon appointee’s held to the law.

But in a time with hair splitting differences between leaders and losers in the Executive and the Legislative, normal does not seem to be working out too well.

One vote can control the Senate and that is because they messed with the 60 votes that used to be needed to approve stuff or nothing ever would have happened in the Senate.

In the house, political scientists can point to just 20 congressional districts out of 435 where the fate of the country will be decided.

This isn’t normal.

Is it?

The other piece that caught my eye was Only Saudi Arabia and Israeli Arabs Can Save Israel as a Jewish Democracy by the ever popular, Thomas l. Friedman.

It is a very thoughtful account of the current state of affairs in Israel.

Mr. Friedman points out that Israel is going into their 5th leadership election in 4 years.

Israel has a Parliament style government where which party can put together a majority coalition gets to be in charge.

With 120 seats, you need 61 to set up a goverment.

Mr. Friedman writes, “Neither the Israeli center-left coalition nor the Israeli right-wing religious nationalist coalition has enough votes alone to create a stable governing majority anymore. That’s why Israel keeps having elections.

So if the Israeli center-left coalition or the Israeli right-wing religious nationalist coalition wants to be in charge they have to make a deal.

There is another party with 12 seats.

If either the Israeli center-left coalition or the Israeli right-wing religious nationalist coalition makes a deal with this group, they win.

And who, you ask, is this group?

Those 12 seats belong the members of parliament elected by registered to vote, Israeli citizen, Arabs that currently make up 21% of the population of Israel.

Hmmmmmmmmmmm.

If you think it sounds simple say outloud:

The ruling Israeli center-left / Arab coalition.

Or,

The ruling Israeli right-wing religious nationalist / Arab coalition.

Maybe making a deal with that Joe Manchin doesn’t look so hard.

BTW, Mr. Brooks did find that person he thought might be the best candidate for 2024.

Theodore Roosevelt.

7.8.2022 – been responsible

been responsible
for lies, fraud – those complicit
utterly ashamed

Adapted from the line:

He has been responsible for lies, scandal and fraud on an industrial scale. And all those who have been complicit should be utterly ashamed.

And … we aren’t talking about anyone in the United States.

The sand ran out on Boris Johnson and Great Britain is looking for ‘Someone who can rebuild trust, heal the country, and set out a new, sensible and consistent economic approach to help families.’

As Patrick Henry said, “Caesar had his Brutus — Charles the First, His Cromwell — And George the Third, may profit by their example”

I leave it to the reader to imagine who I am thinking about.

But there has been a feller here in the United States, who has been responsible for lies, scandal and fraud on an industrial scale.

And all those who have been complicit should be utterly ashamed.

Utterly ashamed!

Utterly!

Completely and without qualification; absolutely.

Utterly ashamed.